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Homemade Sourdough Bread with All-Purpose Flour

Making Homemade Sourdough Bread at home with a beautifully browned Artisan crust can be simple and without kneading, complicated techniques, or any fancy ingredients.

A top down photo of a round sourdough loaf leaning against an oval loaf of sourdough bread sitting on a wooden cutting board. An old knife and a blue napkin are sitting next to the cutting board on a wooden background.

We baked up over 15 loaves of sourdough bread to perfect this Homemade Sourdough Bread recipe with All-Purpose Flour, and have made it several times since.

Does making Homemade Sourdough Bread at home scare you? I get it! That was me a few years ago.

How about a simple Sourdough Bread Recipe that uses plain all-purpose flour, no kneading, or complicated techniques? Are we taming the jitters just a bit?

We want you to be a successful sourdough bread baker so have included several videos and photos with this recipe for Sourdough Bread. Plus, we’re here to answer any of your questions!

Our Overnight Sourdough Bread recipe has been so popular. However, several of you have been asking for a larger loaf recipe, as well as an all-purpose flour bread recipe.

A top down photo of a oval sourdough loaf leaning against a round loaf of sourdough bread sitting on a wooden cutting board. A blue napkin is sitting next to the cutting board on a wooden background.
Round shape also called a “Boule”

Several No-Knead Bread Recipes use instant-rise yeast. This recipe uses natural yeast also known as a starter.

If you don’t have one, you can make your own in 5 to 7 days using our recipe for Sourdough Bread Starter.

Feed your Sourdough Starter

Fed starter is also referred to as a “Levain”. Don’t get hung up on the terms. It’s just a fed starter.

We feed our starter before bed by taking 1 tablespoon of starter and mixing it with 200gr filtered water and 200gr of our 50/50 flour mix. It has always passed the float test the next morning which can be 6 to 8 hours.

This makes more starter than what you will need but I bake several loaves at a time and freeze them.

Making Sourdough Bread

4 grid photo of how to mix sourdough including weighing the sourdough starter, mixing the starter with water, combining dry ingredients, and using a dough scraper to scrape the bread from the sides of the bowl.

Dough Mixing Tips

  • When I measure out my sourdough starter, I wet the bowl so the starter slides right out.
  • Combine the sourdough starter with the water before adding it to the dry ingredients. I find it disperses much easier.
  • Whisk the dry ingredients together before adding the wet ingredients.
  • Use a dough scraper to remove the dough from the sides of the bowl. They work great for removing the dough from your hands and for folding wetter dough too.

Overnight Proof – Room temperature

We use an overnight proof with this recipe. However, I’m going to simplify it even further so you can match it to your schedule.

  1. Feed your starter approximately 6 to 8 hours before mixing your bread ingredients.
  2. We feed our starter before bed by taking 1 tablespoon of starter and mixing it with 200gr filtered water and 200gr of our 50/50 flour mix. It has always passed the float test the next morning which can be 6 to 8 hours. This makes more starter than what you will need but I bake several loaves at a time and freeze them.
    • If you feed your starter at 1:00 p.m. it will be ready to mix by 9:00 p.m.
  3. Do the float test and measure out your ingredients.
  4. Combine all of the ingredients together with your hand until all of the flour is combined and let it rest, covered, for 30 minutes.
    • Tip: Let your bread rest on the counter and in the meantime wash out the bowl and spritz it and a piece of plastic wrap with oil.
    • Make sure you use a large bowl that’s at least twice the size of the dough.
  5. 9:45 p.m. Stretch the sides of the dough to the center, working it all the way around for about 10 folds.
  6. Put it in the oiled bowl and cover it with the plastic wrap for 8 to 12 hours.
  7. Preheat the oven and remove the dough the next morning at 7:45 a.m. Lightly sprinkle flour over your working surface and shape the dough into a tight ball by pulling the outsides to the center and pulling it tightly toward you using the friction of a counter or a cutting board and let it rest for 30 minutes.
    • This video shows you how I did it.
    • You can either shape the dough into a boule (ball) or we often shape it into more of an oval which is great for using it to make sandwiches or toast.
  8. Score the sourdough.
  9. Bake
4 grid photo of folding the dough, proofed dough in a bowl, round shaped dough, and the scored round dough loaf.

Refrigerated Proof

Proofing this sourdough bread dough in the refrigerator can make your life so much easier by following these steps:

  1. Feed your starter, and within 6 to 8 hours, do the float test and measure out your ingredients.
  2. Combine all of the ingredients together with your hand until all of the flour is combined and let it rest, covered, for 30 minutes.
  3. While your dough is resting, prepare a banneton or bowl lined with a flour sack towel that’s been sprinkled with flour. I have photos of how I do this in our Multi-grain Wheat Bread post.
  4. Stretch the sides of the dough to the center, working it all the way around for about 10 folds.
  5. Shape the dough into a tight ball by pulling the outsides to the center and pulling it tightly toward you using the friction of a counter or a cutting board and let it rest covered for 30 minutes.
    • This video shows you how I did it.
  6. Put the dough in the basket or bowl and cover it with the ends of the towel. I then put the whole thing in a plastic grocery bag.
  7. Refrigerate the dough until you’re ready to bake it. My last one sat in the refrigerator for 36 hours!
  8. Preheat the oven and remove the dough from the refrigerator. Let it sit in the bowl or basket until it comes closer to room temperature, approximately 1 hour.
    • I’ve cut this time before and actually extended it to 90 minutes and my bread still came out beautifully.
  9. Bake.

The sourdough bread dough that we proofed in the refrigerator baked up as tall as the Sourdough Bread proofed at room temperature overnight.

The edges may have been a little flatter but nothing that a picky sourdough bread baker would have a problem with.

A angle view of an oval loaf of sourdough bread with a round loaf sitting behind it on a wooden cutting board. A blue napkin and an old knife sit next to the cutting board on a wooden background,.
Oval-shaped Sourdough is perfect for sandwiches

Even though this No-Knead Sourdough Bread recipe is larger than our Overnight Sourdough Bread recipe, we didn’t increase the amount of the Sourdough Starter that I used.

This Basic Sourdough Bread recipe is very easy to work with.

One of the reasons is because it is a 60% hydration recipe which is simply the percent of flour to liquid.

Recipes with higher hydration are much more difficult to work with because they’re much more wet and sticky.

If you want to experiment with other recipes, starting with lower hydration recipes will be easier for you while you’re learning.

Top down photo of a slice of sourdough bread with the cut loaf sitting behind it on a wooden cutting board over a wooden background. A second loaf sits in the background next to an old knife.

No-Knead Sourdough Bread Tips

  • Preheat the oven! I make sure mine is screaming hot at 475°F and start an hour before I want to bake.
    • Make sure your oven rack is centered or slightly lower to accommodate your pot.
    • Remove any racks above it so you have less a chance of burning yourself.
  • If using an enamel dutch oven as I do, make sure that the knob is rated for that high of a temp. This Dutch Oven is.
    • Some pots come with a resin or composite material knob and will start to smell when they get too hot.
  • If you are using parchment paper, it must be rated for at least 425°F or it will catch fire! This parchment paper is the one we use.
  • I have a video showing you how I get my bread in the pot so you don’t burn yourself!
  • Be very careful removing the pot from the oven or the lid from the pot! My daily hot pads don’t handle this heat and leave my arms exposed.
    • I use these longer mitts and leave them right by the oven to remind me not to touch the pot!
  • Use an instant-read thermometer to know when the bread is baked! Tapping it and listening for a hollow sound doesn’t always work. Your bread is done and NOT overbaked when it reaches 212°F.

Be sure to pin this No-Knead Sourdough Bread Recipe

Two photo collage for Pinterest of slices of homemade sourdough bread over a photo of the uncut loaves.

If you enjoy making sourdough bread recipes here are a few more you may enjoy

If you have leftover starter, don’t throw it out. We have some sourdough discard recipes for you.

We LOVE baking bread! You can find all of our bread recipes here!

A top down photo of a round loaf of sourdough bread that has a deep brown crust dusted in flour. The bread sits on a wooden cutting board next to a blue napkin.

Homemade Sourdough Bread Freezes beautifully. Once completely cool, wrap the bread in an airtight plastic bag and then foil for up to 3 months.

Once bread is no longer fresh, I make Homemade Bread Croutons.

A top down photo of a round sourdough loaf leaning against an oval loaf of sourdough bread sitting on a wooden cutting board. An old knife and a blue napkin are sitting next to the cutting board on a wooden background. The title "Homemade Sourdough Bread with All-Purpose Flour is in the upper left corner.
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4.86 from 7 votes

Homemade Sourdough Bread with All-Purpose Flour

Making Homemade Sourdough Bread at home with a beautifully browned Artisan crust can be simple and without kneading, complicated techniques, or any fancy ingredients.
Prep Time 15 mins
Cook Time 55 mins
Overnight rest 8 hrs 30 mins
Total Time 9 hrs 40 mins
Servings 24 slices
Author Julie Menghini

Ingredients

  • 150 g bubbly starter
  • 427 g *purified water or filtered water at room temperature
  • 750 g all-purpose flour
  • 13 g sea salt fine

Instructions

  • In a bowl that is twice as big as the dough ball, mix all of the ingredients together with your hand.  Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and let the dough rest covered in the bowl for 30 minutes.
  • Stretch and fold the dough into the bowl several times for about a minute.  If the dough is sticky, dip your fingers in water to prevent the dough from sticking to them. Cover and leave the dough out on the counter overnight (8-12 hours).  In the morning it will have doubled in volume at least.
  • Pre-heat the oven to 240/250C (I preheat to 475°F and place your lidded pot inside to heat up).  You can use an enamel dutch oven or aluminum roaster.  You can also put the dough into a cold pot. 
  • Dust your counter lightly with flour.  I use a rimmed baking sheet lined with parchment paper and then dusted with rice flour if my dough isn't overly sticky.  It makes it easy to pick up the dough.  Scrape the dough out onto the counter.  Don't punch it down.  You want to keep as many of those bubbles as you can.
  • Pull the outside thirds into the middle and shape as you wish.  Try to pull the outside of the dough as tightly as possible so it will hold its shape well.  I shaped mine into a ball also known as a boule.
  • Cover with some oiled plastic wrap loosely.   Allow the dough to rest for 30 minutes.  Set the timer as this is the only proofing that should NOT be overdone.
  • Remove the plastic wrap and slash the top with a sharp knife or lame.  
  • Carefully remove the pot from the oven and remove the lid.  Carefully place the dough into the pot.  I lift mine by the edges of the parchment paper and put the whole thing into the pot.  Replace the lid and place in the oven.
  • Reduce the heat to 220C (425°F convection).  Bake for 30 minutes.  Remove the lid and bake for an additional 20 to 25 minutes or until an instant-read thermometer reads 212°F.
  • Immediately remove the bread from the pot and cool on a cooling rack completely before slicing.

Video

Notes

*Start with 427g of water but if the dough is too dry add up to an additional 15g.
  • Feed earlier in the day. When it’s bubbly do the test float. If it’s runny it’s used up all it’s energy and needs to be fed again before you can use it. To see if your starter is ready, put a small amount in a bowl or cup of water. If it floats it’s ready!
  • Your bread can be cooked in a cold dutch oven but I like the color and rise I get from preheating my lidded pot.
  • This bread freezes beautifully. I wrap it in plastic wrap or a ziplock bag and then heavy-duty foil.

Nutrition

Calories: 113kcal | Carbohydrates: 23g | Protein: 4g | Fat: 1g | Saturated Fat: 1g | Sodium: 211mg | Potassium: 31mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 1g | Calcium: 5mg | Iron: 1mg
This recipe was calculated using the exact brands and measurements I used to make this recipe. If you are following a strict diet please note changing anything will cause the nutritional info to change. My calculations are intended as a guide only.
Tried this recipe? That’s awesome!Mention @hostessatheart or tag #hostessatheart!

Still looking for bread recipes? Here are some of our favorite all-time bread recipes!

If you have issues with proofing your bread, I highly recommend the Raisenne® Dough Riser. I love it so much that I’ve become their brand ambassador.

Bowl filled with bread dough sitting on a Raisenne Dough Proofer

You can read more about this product in our Strawberry Kuchen Recipe and our Kifli Walnut Roll Recipe.

Recipe Rating




Julia

Wednesday 18th of August 2021

You say to reduce temp to 425 convection. Does that mean 450 in a non-convection oven?

Julie Menghini

Wednesday 18th of August 2021

Hi Julia, some ovens automatically make the adjustment for you but if yours does not, 450 degrees is the proper reduction.

Marc-André Michon

Thursday 1st of July 2021

For those that live in northern climates, try proofing the sourdough in a parchment lined instant pot for about 4 hours (on yogurt setting at 85°F). Try removing the dough once per hour and folding it without breaking the bubbles! It was innnncredible.

Julie Menghini

Friday 2nd of July 2021

Thank you for the tip Marc-Andre! I'm sure it will be valuable for many of our sourdough community. I'll definitely be giving that a try this winter too.

Cindy

Tuesday 18th of May 2021

I started late in the day and so I didn’t get it into the bowl to rise until 4:30. I’m thinking about putting it in the refrigerator to retard the rise until morning. I hope it’s ok.

Julie Menghini

Wednesday 19th of May 2021

That would be my recommendation to Cindy. Let me know how it goes ~ Julie

Amy Nash

Wednesday 12th of August 2020

This is the most perfect looking loaf of sourdough I have made yet! It turned out so great!

Julie Menghini

Friday 14th of August 2020

Thank you, Amy!

Paige

Sunday 9th of August 2020

This looks GREAT and I've been wanting to try this! Really helpful tutorial here too!

Julie Menghini

Tuesday 11th of August 2020

Thanks, Paige!